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Elements of Visual Art - Texture

Grades: K, 1, 2, 3
Related Subjects: English - Language Arts, Visual & Performing Arts
Medium: Mixed Media
Class time required: 1 X 40 minute session
Author: SDMA Education Department

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Summary

In this one-session lesson, students will be able to identify texture in works of art. Students will then create a texture collage.

Materials

  • Book that introduces texture
  • 9x12 heavy paper or tag board
  • Scissors
  • Glue sticks
  • Masking tape (colored if possible) - optional
  • Assorted "texture materials" such as cotton balls, rug yarn, sand paper, textured papers, leaves, pipe cleaners, paper towels, etc. Use materials that can be easily glued or taped with the masking tape.
  • Assorted "taste materials" (fruit roll-up, fruit, etc.)
  • Glossary terms: texture

Images

Untitled, Janet Sobel

Untitled, Janet Sobel
Janet Sobel

Untitled, Charles Arnoldi

Untitled, Charles Arnoldi
Charles Arnoldi

Aluminum Horse #5

Aluminum Horse #5
Deborah Butterfield

Suit of Armor

Suit of Armor
Myochin Morisuke

Baja California Circle

Baja California Circle
Richard Long

Teachers Preparation

  • Print the images onto overhead transparencies.

Procedures

1. Use examples of artworks to show how artists use paint and sculpture in different ways to show us texture. Explain that we can explore texture in many ways: with our eyes, our hands and our bodies—even with our tongue.

2. Pass around familiar objects and have the students explore texture with their hands and bodies—even things like sand in a bucket and bare feet! Have students use as many words as possible to describe the textures they are touching.

3. Pass out a piece of fruit rollup or another treat and explore with the tongue. Explain that flavor and texture are different.

4. Hand out materials. Instruct the students to create a piece of artwork using materials with different textures.

5. Have the students write a journal entry describing the different textures used in their pieces of art.

Extensions
Visual and Performing Arts: Students can create 3-D animals out of clay and attach materials with different textures, such as feathers, sand, fur, etc.

Standards

CA Content Standards

Kindergarten Visual Arts:
1.3 Identify the elements of art (line, color, shape/form, texture, value, space) in the environment and in works of art, emphasizing line, color, and shape/form.

First Grade Visual Arts:
1.3 Identify the elements of art in objects in nature, in the environment, and in works of art, emphasizing line, color, shape/form, and texture.

2.1 Use texture in two-dimensional and three-dimensional works of art.

4.1 Discuss works of art created in the classroom, focusing on selected elements of art (e.g., shape/form, texture, line, color).

Second Grade Visual Arts:
1.3 Identify the elements of art in objects in nature, the environment, and works of art, emphasizing line, color, shape/form, texture, and space.

Kindergarten English-Language Arts:
1.0 Students write words and brief sentences that are legible.

2.1 Describe people, places, things (e.g., size, color, shape), locations, and actions.

First Grade English-Language Arts:
2.2 Respond to who, what, when, where, and how questions.

1.0 Students write clear and coherent sentences and paragraphs that develop a central idea. Their writing shows they consider the audience and purpose.

2.1 Write brief narratives (e.g., fictional, autobiographical) describing an experience.

1.0 Students listen critically and respond appropriately to oral communication.

Second Grade English-Language Arts:
1.0 Students write clear and coherent sentences and paragraphs that develop a central idea. Their writing shows they consider the audience and purpose.

2.1 Write brief narratives based on their experiences.

1.0 Students listen critically and respond appropriately to oral communication.

Bibliography/Webography

Teachers

Gray, Donna B. From the Eye of the Camera to the Hand of the Artist. Cincinnati, OH: Betterway Books, 1992. [section titled “Elements of Art and Principles of Design”]

Sparkes, Roy. Teaching Art Basics. London: B. T. Batsford; New York: Watson-Guptill Publications, 1973.


Learning to Look at Art
Learn about the elements of art by looking at famous pieces of artwork.  This Web site provides background information on the piece of artwork and descriptions of how each piece is an example of an art element (line, color, texture, shape, form, space, and value.)  It also includes interactive and printable activities for students.

Foundations in Art, University of Delaware
An introduction to the elements of art that includes images of artwork and concise explanations.

Art Basics, San Diego State University
The seven formal elements of art are described on this Web site.

A Guide to Building Visual Arts Lessons, The J. Paul Getty Museum
This comprehensive Web site includes definitions and examples of art elements, as well as a grade-by-grade guide to creating lessons for the classroom.  It also includes several CA-standards aligned lesson plans for each grade level that focus on the elements of art.

Students

Cacavas, Bonnie Becker. Tickly Prickly. New York: HarperFestival, 1999.

Court, Rob. Texture. Chanhassen, MN: Child’s World. 2003

Hoban, Tana. Is it Rough? Is it Smooth? Is it Shiny? New York: Greenwillow Books, 1984.

The Artist’s Toolkit: Visual Elements and Principles
Students can “Explore the Toolkit” to learn about and interact with the elements of art and create their own artwork.

Partners


Museum of Photographic Arts
Mingei Museum Timken Museum of Art

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